Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Publications

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

7-1992

Journal or Book Title

Transactions of the ASAE

Volume

35

Issue

4

First Page

1173

Last Page

1177

Research Focus Area(s)

Land and Water Resources Engineering

DOI

10.13031/2013.28716

Abstract

Effects of excessive-water stress on corn vegetative growth and nutrient uptake were investigated in environmentally controlled growth chambers. Two excessive-water treatments (soil surface submergence and water table at 15-cm depth) and four excessive-water stress levels (equivalent to 90, 180, 270, and 360 cm-day of stress as defined by SEW30 concept) were imposed at 21 days after emergence. Data on plant growth parameters (i.e., height, leaf area, dry matter, and shoot uptake of N, P, and K) were compared for both water-table positions. Corn plants were significantly larger when a water table was imposed at the 15-cm depth than when the surface was submerged at all excessive-water stress levels. Plant nutrient uptake also was greater when a water table was maintained at 15 cm below the surface than when the surface was submerged. Nutrient uptake decreased significantly with increasing stress level for the submerged-surface treatment, but the trend was not consistent for the water-table treatment.

Comments

This article is from Transactions of the ASAE 35 (1992): 1173–1177, doi:10.13031/2013.28716.

Copyright Owner

American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers

Language

en

Date Available

2014-07-20

File Format

application/pdf

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