Authors

United States Department of Energy
Robert D. Perlack, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Laurence M. Eaton, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Anthony F. Turhollow Jr., Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Matt H. Langholtz, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Craig C. Brandt, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Mark E. Downing, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Robin L. Graham, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Lynn L. Wright, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Jacob M. Kavkewitz, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Anna M. Shamey, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Richard G. Nelson, Kansas State University
Bryce J. Stokes, United States Department of Energy
William L. Rooney, Texas A&M University
David J. Muth Jr., Idaho National LaboratoryFollow
J. Richard Hess, Idaho National Laboratory
Jared M. Abodeely, Idaho National Laboratory
Chad Hellwinckel, University of Tennessee
Danial De La Torre Ugarte, University of Tennessee
Daniel C. Yoder, University of Tennessee
James P. Lyon, University of Tennessee
Timothy G. Rials, University of Tennessee
Timothy A. Volk, State University of New York
Thomas S. Buchholz, State University of New York
Lawrence P. Abrahamson, State University of New York
Robert P. Anex, Iowa State University
Thomas B. Voigt, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
William Berguson, University of Minnesota
Don E. Riemenschneider, University of Minnesota
Douglas Karlen, United States Department of AgricultureFollow
Jane M. F. Johnson, United States Department of Agriculture
Robert B. Mitchell, United States Department of Agriculture
Kenneth P. Vogel, United States Department of Agriculture
Edward P. Richard Jr., United States Department of Agriculture
John Tatarko, United States Department of Agriculture
Larry E. Wagner, United States Department of Agriculture
Kenneth E. Skog, United States Department of Agriculture
Patricia K. Lebow, United States Department of Agriculture
Dennis P. Dykstra, United States Department of Agriculture
Marilyn A. Buford, United States Department of Agriculture
Patrick D. Miles, United States Department of Agriculture
D. Andrew Scott, United States Department of Agriculture
James H. Perdue, United States Department of Agriculture
Robert B. Rummer, United States Department of Agriculture
Jamie Barbour, United States Department of Agriculture
John A. Stanturf, United States Department of Agriculture
David B. McKeever, United States Department of Agriculture
Ronald S. Zalesny Jr., United States Department of Agriculture
Edmund A. Gee, United States Department of Agriculture
P. Daniel Cassidy, United States Department of Agriculture
David Lightle, United States Department of Agriculture

Document Type

Report

Peer Reviewed

1

Publication Date

8-2011

Grant Number

DE-AC05-00OR22725

Granting or Sponsoring Agency

U.S. Department of Energy

Abstract

The Report, Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (generally referred to as the Billion-Ton Study or 2005 BTS), was an estimate of “potential” biomass within the contiguous United States based on numerous assumptions about current and future inventory and production capacity, availability, and technology. In the 2005 BTS, a strategic analysis was undertaken to determine if U.S. agriculture and forest resources have the capability to potentially produce at least one billion dry tons of biomass annually, in a sustainable manner—enough to displace approximately 30% of the country’s present petroleum consumption. To ensure reasonable confidence in the study results, an effort was made to use relatively conservative assumptions. However, for both agriculture and forestry, the resource potential was not restricted by price. That is, all identified biomass was potentially available, even though some potential feedstock would more than likely be too expensive to actually be economically available.

In addition to updating the 2005 study, this report attempts to address a number of its shortcomings

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf