Campus Units

Apparel, Events and Hospitality Management

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

Winter 2007

Journal or Book Title

Collections: A Journal for Museum and Archives Professionals

Volume

3

Issue

1

First Page

53

Last Page

74

Abstract

Consumption is one way individuals effectively deal with their feelings of anomie, or social instability resulting from a breakdown of standards and values, in contemporary, postmodern society. Through the purchase and use of particular products, consumed objects create or produce personal identities. A specialized form of consumption, collecting, in this case ethnographic textile collecting, plays a key role in the quest for self-authentication and community in contemporary Western Culture. In this paper, twelve collectors of ethnographic textiles were interviewed to better understand the manners and meanings of collecting as a specialized form of consumption. The collectors of ethnographic textiles used their collections as a way to both express their personal identity and become part of a larger community of textile collectors. Arnould and Prices's (2000) theoretical model of authenticating acts and authoritative performances guided the analysis of the spoken word of the collectors interviewed.

Comments

This article is from Collections: A Journal for Museum and Archives Professionals, 2007, 3(1); 53-74. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

AltraMira Press

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf