•  
  •  
 

Animal Industry Report

Extension Number

ASL R2284

Topic

Beef

Summary and Implications

Data describing 220 lots of beef cattle in the Tri-County Steer Carcass Futurity program from 2003 through 2007 were analyzed using a multiple regression statistical model to determine specific factors that influence lot low Choice and above rate and lot premium Choice (Certified Angus Beef © ) acceptance rate. Lot low Choice and above rate was similar for years 2005-2007. This rate was significantly lower in 2003 than 2004 but both the 2003 and 2004 rates were similar to the rate in all other years. Lots consisting of heifers had higher (P<.05) low Choice and above rates than lots of steers or mixed-sex pens. The greater the amount of Angus influence in the cattle, the higher the low Choice and above rate (P<.0001). An inverse relationship existed between feedlot in-weight and lot low Choice and above rate; those cattle with lighter feedlot arrival weights had higher % Choice and above rates (P=.0007). Cattle with lower disposition scores (calmer cattle) had higher % Choice and above rates (P=.0496). Low Choice and above rate increased as cattle became less efficient in converting feed to gain (P=.0027). An inverse relationship existed between cost of gain and low Choice and above rate; those cattle with lower cost of gain had higher low Choice and above rates (P=.0043). Lot low Choice and above rate increased as average daily gain increased (P=.0094). Factors examined that did not have a significant effect on lot low Choice and above rate were: mud score at final sort, geographic region of origin, lot mortality rate, number of harvest groups within each lot, days on feed, adjusted final weight, individual treatment cost per head, lot size, and season of harvest.

Lot premium Choice acceptance rate was similar in each year from 2003-2006 but was significantly lower in 2007 compared with all other years. Lots consisting of heifers had higher (P<.05) premium Choice acceptance rates than lots of steers or mixed-sex pens. Cattle harvested during the months October through December had a lower lot premium Choice acceptance rate than those harvested during January through March, April through June, or July through September (P<.05). The greater the amount of Angus influence in the cattle, the higher the lot premium Choice acceptance rate (P<.0064). An inverse relationship existed between feedlot in-weight and lot premium Choice acceptance rate; those cattle with lighter feedlot arrival weights had higher premium Choice acceptance rates (P<.0001). Lot premium Choice acceptance rate increased as average daily gain increased (P=.0003); however lots of cattle that were less efficient at converting feed into gain had higher premium Choice acceptance rates (P<.0104). Factors examined that did not have a significant effect on lot premium Choice acceptance rate were: mud score at final sort, individual treatment cost per head, number of harvest groups within each lot, days on feed, cost of gain, lot size, geographic region of origin, average disposition score, adjusted final weight, and lot mortality rate.

Copyright Holder

Iowa State University

Language

en

Share

COinS