Location

Ames, Iowa

Start Date

29-4-2016 12:00 AM

Description

Identification of a single complete set of bones can be considerably challenging given the condition of the bones; however, identifying tens to hundreds of different bones, how many complete sets are present, and to whom they belong is a complete different story. Throughout the world today there are many mass disasters that take the lives of hundreds and even thousands of people, leaving remains behind that are fragmented, heavily impacted by the incident and environment, or completely obliterated. Mass disaster remains can be identified through techniques in genomic analysis that use extracted DNA from remains that have potential to be completely destroyed such as the hair and bones, as well as remains that are more resistant to decomposition such as the teeth. Through a critical review, some simple critical questions will be answered. How accurate have these genomic techniques been in the identification of mass disaster remains, what are the inaccuracies in the methods, and how could they be improved?

 
Apr 29th, 12:00 AM

A Critical Review of the Identification of Mass Disaster Remains Through the Use of Genomic Analysis

Ames, Iowa

Identification of a single complete set of bones can be considerably challenging given the condition of the bones; however, identifying tens to hundreds of different bones, how many complete sets are present, and to whom they belong is a complete different story. Throughout the world today there are many mass disasters that take the lives of hundreds and even thousands of people, leaving remains behind that are fragmented, heavily impacted by the incident and environment, or completely obliterated. Mass disaster remains can be identified through techniques in genomic analysis that use extracted DNA from remains that have potential to be completely destroyed such as the hair and bones, as well as remains that are more resistant to decomposition such as the teeth. Through a critical review, some simple critical questions will be answered. How accurate have these genomic techniques been in the identification of mass disaster remains, what are the inaccuracies in the methods, and how could they be improved?