Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Conference

94th ACSA Annual Meeting

Publication Date

2006

City

Salt Lake City, UT

Abstract

Driving on a highway in Iowa, corn cribs can be seen at a rate of approximately one crib every couple of miles. Corn Cribs are naturally ventilated timber structures used for storing the crop after the harvest. They are seen nowadays un-maintained, left to decay; announcing a dying facility that was replaced with the new storage buildings equipped with automatic temperature and humidity controls. Other than being technologically obsolete, these dilapidating corn cribs also announce the gradual disappearance of a way of life in the American Midwest. A way of life that is associated with the family farm, which is the main agricultural production unit. A family farm is defined as a "...family-owned farm with enough land to support the family and no more land than could be farmed by the labor force of the family.

Comments

Published in Proceedings of the 94th Annual Meeting of Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture, Getting Real: Design Ethos Now, Salt Lake City-Utah, April 2006 (Washington, D.C.: ACSA, 2006). Pp. 309-315.

Copyright Owner

ACSA

Language

en

Included in

Architecture Commons

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Article Location

 
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