Campus Units

Architecture

Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Publication Date

2006

Conference Title

34th Annual European Studies Conference

Conference Date

October 2006

City

Omaha, NE, United States

Abstract

When thinking categorically about Marcel Duchamp's art, one is confronted with an apparent paradox: it simultaneously encourages and resists classification. The characteristic is pervasive. It is a quality found in the individual piece as well as in the collected œuvre. For, while Duchamp promoted the unique and inventive, while he abhorred routine, eschewed the habitual as taste making and subscribed to a philosophy of indifference, at the same time he also underscored the cumulative nature of his work. The Large Glass, the Boite-en-valise[1], the Arensburg Collection itself: all consciously group Duchamp’s works together and thereby encourage a context—a fabricated, artificial ground—against which the singular piece must be read. Duchamp packaged his production. He provided an artificial backdrop that insists on its own artificiality. This paradox is, in a sense, the essence of Duchamp's art.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Article Location

 
COinS