Proceedings

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2010
Saturday, February 27th
12:00 AM

Dealing with Legal Liability Issues: A How-to-Guide for Protecting Yourself and Your Farm

Erin C. Herbold, Iowa State University

12:00 AM

Protecting yourself, your farm and your family from exposure to legal liability is something that every farmer must deal with. Having a good team behind you, including an attorney, financial advisor, and insurance agent, is the best way to protect your assets and way of life. Having a basic understanding of the law and how it applies to you and others can help you avoid the dreaded lawsuit and associated expenses that go along with it.

Feeding Beef Cows in Winter

Robert Kallenbach, University of Missouri

12:00 AM

Feeding hay to cattle is expensive. The expense of producing, making and feeding hay accounts for approximately 50% of the cost to produce beef and 30% of the cost to produce milk in the Midwest. By using winter pastures to extend the grazing season, producers can reduce the amount of hay they feed and in doing so substantially reduce input costs.

Livestock and Laundry, Crops and Kids: A Woman’s Role in Agriculture

Jenni Peters, Peters Beef Genetics

12:00 AM

I want to thank Byron Leu for asking me to speak today and I think Denise had something to do with this too. So thank you both. Byron called me back in October. I think all of you can remember, or maybe you don’t want to remember, what the weather was like then. It was raining and at home we were all trying to think of jobs to accomplish until the monsoon let up. Everyone was anxious to get the corn out of the field and let our cows have some good grazing on the stalks. Byron asked if I could come and talk about women in agriculture. I wasn’t quite sure what he exactly wanted me to talk about, because women in agriculture is a pretty broad topic. As far as I am concerned, it is the second oldest profession, and I think you all know what the first is.

Optimizing Forage Production During the Growing Season

Robert Kallenbach, University of Missouri

12:00 AM

Cow/calf producers rely on forage to supply more than 85% of all feed units to the herd. Yet, many beef producers do not think critically about the contribution of forages to the profitability of their beef operations. They should. As far as forages go, pasture is a far more economical way to deliver feed to cattle than is hay or other stored forages. Recent analyses show that forage from pasture costs 40 to 60% less than stored forage (hay, silage) per pound of beef produced. That is substantial. And records supplied by IRM-SPA from real beef operations show that the most profitable producers feed the least stored forage, relying on pasture more days of the year.

Reproductive Strategies that Work

Tom Geary, Pfizer Animal Health

12:00 AM

Simple Practices for Better Hay

Jim Buchs, John Deere

12:00 AM

Making ‘Quality Hay’ is anything but simple. Quality hay is nutritious, digestible, palatable, free of contaminates such as toxic weeds, dirt, manure, metal, glass, plastic, mold and rotten material. So concentrate on the things that you can manage, plan ahead and know all your options. What is your goal? Only to make enough hay to cover non-pasture resources, have hay to sell, make only hay to be stored in one type of package. Have round bales for outdoors storage, small bales for in a barn and/or baled silage too

Tips to Help Make Dog Training Easier

Gerry Goehring

12:00 AM

Socialize your puppy. Don‟t just get a pup and put them in a kennel or put them in a stall in a barn and expect them to come out a year later and have someone be able to train your dog. Let a puppy be a puppy. Lots of contact with the family, and in my personal opinion, there is nothing better than having a puppy grow up with kids.