Event Title

Anaplasmosis in Iowa

Start Date

26-2-2011 12:00 AM

Description

In 2010 we saw an increased number of cases of Anaplasmosis from submissions to the Iowa State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (ISU-VDL). Although the disease is not enzootic in Iowa it is observed regularly. Environmental conditions in 2010 may have enhanced the spread of anaplasmosis within the state. Anaplasmosis is caused by a protaozoan parasite (Anaplasma marginale) that is spread by ticks and biting insects. Additionally, it can be transmitted by needles or surgical equipment. Once the parasite reaches the blood stream in infects red blood cells (RBCs) where they multiply. Anemia results from a phagocytosis of the RBCs. Anemic animals will develop icterus (jaundice) but not hemoglobinuria (red urine) because RBC destruction occurs from phagocytosis in the spleen rather than RBC lysis in the blood vessels.

 
Feb 26th, 12:00 AM

Anaplasmosis in Iowa

In 2010 we saw an increased number of cases of Anaplasmosis from submissions to the Iowa State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (ISU-VDL). Although the disease is not enzootic in Iowa it is observed regularly. Environmental conditions in 2010 may have enhanced the spread of anaplasmosis within the state. Anaplasmosis is caused by a protaozoan parasite (Anaplasma marginale) that is spread by ticks and biting insects. Additionally, it can be transmitted by needles or surgical equipment. Once the parasite reaches the blood stream in infects red blood cells (RBCs) where they multiply. Anemia results from a phagocytosis of the RBCs. Anemic animals will develop icterus (jaundice) but not hemoglobinuria (red urine) because RBC destruction occurs from phagocytosis in the spleen rather than RBC lysis in the blood vessels.