Proceedings

Subscribe to RSS Feed

2013
Saturday, January 19th
12:00 AM

A Look into the Future of the Cattle Industry

Lee L. Schulz, Iowa State University
Glynn Tonsor, Kansas State University

Ottumwa, IA

12:00 AM

Weather, cattle supplies, beef demand, prospects of herd expansion (or the lack thereof), and similar issues currently dominate many industry conversations. Some clarity and signals for the future may appear in the closely watched January Cattle report, released February 1. However, the future of the cattle industry can best be understood when considered against the backdrop of the unique beef cattle market situation that has developed.

Confinement Feeding Beef Cows

Rick Rasby, University of Nebraska

Ottumwa, IA

12:00 AM

A management consideration when weather conditions result in a reduction in forage production in pastures is to relocate some or all cattle. Cows could be relocated to a feedlot that is located off-site or a dry lot or sacrifice area to dry lot cows on-site could be developed.

Cover Crops Cover a Lot of Possibilities

Stephen K. Barnhart, Iowa State University
David Otte, Green Valley Seeds, LLC

Ottumwa, IA

12:00 AM

Cover crops have been used for centuries. However, today's modern farmers have grown up in a generation or two which has replaced the use of cover crops with fertilizers and herbicides.

Drought Year Feed Options for Coy Herds

Daniel D. Loy, Iowa State University

Ottumwa, IA

12:00 AM

Cattlemen in Iowa and much of the country are beginning the home stretch with drought reduced feed and forage supplies from the 2012 crop. For many, hay supplies were significantly reduced or used to stretch the parched pastures and grasslands from last summer.

Emergency Conservation Program (ECP)

John Whitaker, United States Department of Agriculture

Ottumwa, IA

12:00 AM

The Energy Conservation Program (ECP) was established to provide cost share to eligible agricultural producers to rehabilitate farmland and conservation practices damaged by natural disasters and provide cost share assistance during periods of severe drought.

Have Your Pastures Survived the Drought of 2012?

Kenneth Suter

Ottumwa, IA

12:00 AM

Importance of Rural Water to Southern Iowa's Livestock Industry

John Glenn, Rathbun Regional Water Association

Ottumwa, IA

12:00 AM

An important partnership exists between Iowa’s rural water systems and the state’s livestock industry. This partnership helps ensure that thousands of farms with livestock across the state have ready access to a reliable supply of quality water. Livestock operations in Iowa rely on rural water systems in a variety of ways. In many situations, rural water systems provide a backup supply to the natural sources of water such as ponds that are available for livestock use. At the same time, a significant number of operations depend on rural water as the primary supply of water for their livestock on a daily basis. In almost all cases, periods of drought underscore the essential role that the state’s rural water systems play in supporting Iowa’s livestock industry.

John Deere's Outlook on Cattle Economics

Andy Hansen, John Deere

Ottumwa, IA

12:00 AM

The drought of 2012 caused many implications to the agriculture industry. Low yielding crops, cattle herd liquidations, and increasing input costs are a few of the areas that were impacted.

Looking Back at What's Ahead—One Man's View

Steve Folgesong, Black Gold Ranch and Feedlot

Ottumwa, IA

12:00 AM

Surviving and thriving in this business can be challenging enough most years, but when you add in the extra stress of the worst drought in 50 years it can be down right depressing. The lessons learned last year will be of great benefit in the future— and the future may be now!

Water Quality for Livestock

Steven M. Ensley, Iowa State University

Ottumwa, IA

12:00 AM

Water is essential for all forms of life. The availability of adequate quantities and quality of water has the largest impact on the types of life and numbers of individuals that an environment can sustain and may be a limiting factor for livestock production systems. As water availability for human use becomes limited, water quality available for production animals will likely be of lessor quality. Large-scale animal production practices and emphasis on animal performance increase the demands on water delivery systems and increase concern about water quality.