Proceedings

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2014
Saturday, January 18th
12:00 AM

Baleage—Making & Utilizing Higher Quality Hay

Dave Robison, Legacy Seeds, Inc.

Ottumwa, IA

12:00 AM

In this discussion I will show how cereal grains and annual ryegrass can be used very well as a forage crop harvested as baleage. In addition I will show how making alfalfa hay at the proper stage greatly enhances animal performance.

Can Selection Indexes Improve Profitability in Beef Cattle

Lee Leachman, Leachman Cattle of Colorado

Ottumwa, IA

12:00 AM

As a bull producer, I know that my long-term business success depends on the financial success of my customers. As such, we try to select the bulls we produce for the traits that drive profit into our customers’ herds. Our Angus, Red Angus, and Stabilizer herds are selected based on a maternal profit index. Our Charolais are selected on strictly terminal profit index. We produce and market over 1200 bulls per year. These bulls primarily sell to progressive minded ranchers in the high plains

Controlling Costs to Improve Profit Potential

Jim Werner, Werner Family Angus

Ottumwa, IA

12:00 AM

Jim and Ann Werner Registered Angus is a family operation. Both Jim and Ann grew up on farms and are fortunate that their four children and their families are all part of the business.

Cow-Share Agreements: Starting or Expanding a Cow Herd

Patrick B. Wall, Iowa State University

Ottumwa, IA

12:00 AM

Attractive feeder calf prices in recent years have sparked a renewed interest in cow-calf production from beef enthusiasts wanting to either enter the business or expand their current operation. An aging population of farmers with pasture acres offers a unique opportunity for the development of cow-share agreements between the two parties. These are important documents that may be crucial to expanding the nation’s cowherd in the near term and add to the long term sustainability of the beef industry.

Feeding and Economic Considerations for Baleage Use in Cow-calf Diets

Patrick J. Gunn, Iowa State University

Ottumwa, IA

12:00 AM

Recent years of drought and suboptimal hay-making conditions have left many cattlemen in Iowa and much of the country with either reduced or poorer quality forage supplies, thus resulting in sharp forage price increases over the past 2 years. Feed costs in the cow-calf sector are often greater that 60% of total production costs, with a large proportion of that 60% derived from forage expenditures. Thus, evaluating harvested forage management practices and adopting new schemes that may increase forage quality, as well as reduce dry matter (DM) losses and feed wastage, are essential to minimizing wintering feed costs and maintaining profitability.

Livestock Marketing/Price Risk Management

Ryan Drollette, Iowa State University

Ottumwa, IA

12:00 AM

Raising livestock has always been a challenging and risky operation. Producers deal with many different types of risk involving production, marketing/price, financial, legal, and human resource risk. Production risk is one that is usually dealt with on a daily basis. The effects of a drought reducing the availability of grazed forages and increased feeding costs. Sickness or disease may limit weight gain or be detrimental to reproductive performance. A late winter storm during calving season can result in sickness and even death for many new born calves. Producers generally have management plans in place to mitigate many of these types of production risks. For example, nutritional supplements are often fed to offset shortages in range or pasture conditions, cattle may be moved to more protected areas for calving, and animals are vaccinated to reduce incidence of sickness or disease.

Replacement Heifer Development: Changing Minds for the Change in Times

Brian Huedepohl, Veterinary Medical Center

Ottumwa, IA

12:00 AM

Over the past 10-11 years there have been a lot of changes in agriculture that led to changes in how some have managed their beef herds. One of those areas in the beef production processes is heifer development. In 2003 Veterinary Medical Center(VMC) organized and placed heifers in a dry feedlot setting to develop and breed.

Risk Management for Cattlemen

Tony Latcham, Son Risk Management

Ottumwa, IA

12:00 AM

Livestock insurance was first sold in 2002 and initially ran into problems as that pilot got underway. As the program evolved bugs were worked through and we ended up with two products that provide price protection for livestock producers at a reasonable cost. In this presentation I will review the two types of livestock insurance available and go through examples of when and where they are appropriate to utilize in your marketing scheme.

Using Cover Crops to Boost Profitability in Your Operation

Dave Robison, Legacy Seeds, Inc.

Ottumwa, IA

12:00 AM

In the Robison Farm’s years of grazing cattle in central and southern Indiana we utilized grazing corn stalks and some stockpiled tall fescue throughout the winter to reduce feed cost. While this proved beneficial most years we ended up with some added compaction in our corn fields (we did not rotationally graze our stalks). While we continued the practice we also utilized “V-Rippers” to break up compaction problems, thus usually reducing or eliminating the feed cost savings. After many years of raising cattle we sold our cow-calf operation in the early 1980’s. I believe that if we knew about cover crops, rotational grazing, fescue endophyte issues, etc… that our farm would have had cattle many more years. Our purpose today is to look most specifically at cover crops and how they can boost profitability in your cattle and farming operation so you choose to keep your cattle –and utilize them as a profit center.