Publication Date

2013 12:00 AM

Description

The combination of decreasing acres available for crop production, an increasing world population, increased utilization of grain for fuel and increased input costs (fuel, transportation, and fertilizer) have resulted in limited feed supplies and higher feed costs. Additionally, the recent drought in much of the United States has further reduced the available feed supply driving feed costs dramatically higher. Historically, feed costs have represented 50D70% of the cost of production for beef enterprises. This past year, the high prices for corn and hay have driven that percentage over 80% for many operations. CowDcalf producers have been forced to investigate alternative feedstuffs to lower the cost of production. Ideally, the cowherd is grazing a significant portion of the year. Grazing days varies drastically throughout different regions of the United States and is greatly impacted by year to year differences in weather patterns. Drought limits summer grazing. Snow and ice can limit winter grazing. Harvested and stored feeds represent the majority of feed costs for cowDcalf producers. With hay supplies low and hay costs high, producers need to consider alternative feeds for winter feeding and for emergency drought relief.

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Alternative Feedstuffs and Changing Coproducts for Cowherd

The combination of decreasing acres available for crop production, an increasing world population, increased utilization of grain for fuel and increased input costs (fuel, transportation, and fertilizer) have resulted in limited feed supplies and higher feed costs. Additionally, the recent drought in much of the United States has further reduced the available feed supply driving feed costs dramatically higher. Historically, feed costs have represented 50D70% of the cost of production for beef enterprises. This past year, the high prices for corn and hay have driven that percentage over 80% for many operations. CowDcalf producers have been forced to investigate alternative feedstuffs to lower the cost of production. Ideally, the cowherd is grazing a significant portion of the year. Grazing days varies drastically throughout different regions of the United States and is greatly impacted by year to year differences in weather patterns. Drought limits summer grazing. Snow and ice can limit winter grazing. Harvested and stored feeds represent the majority of feed costs for cowDcalf producers. With hay supplies low and hay costs high, producers need to consider alternative feeds for winter feeding and for emergency drought relief.