Publication Date

2014 12:00 AM

Description

Corn prices have been variable the past few years and generally more expensive. As a result, we have initiated a few different research programs to address these needs. Early on, grain was expensive ($5/bu or more), distillers grains (wet or modified) were relatively inexpensive as a percentage of grain price (70 to 90% on a dry-to-dry basis), and corn residue (baled stalks) were relatively inexpensive ($50 to $70/ton). As a result, research focused on how to use more residue and distillers grains and less corn grain. Two research areas were evaluated: alkaline treatment of corn stalks and increasing use of corn silage as methods to decrease corn usage. The questions were if you decrease corn inclusion, will performance be maintained or will feed conversion get worse. Even with some depression (increase) in F:G, will cost of gain be more competitive.

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Use of unique or non-traditional feeds: Are we revisiting old school feedlot diets?

Corn prices have been variable the past few years and generally more expensive. As a result, we have initiated a few different research programs to address these needs. Early on, grain was expensive ($5/bu or more), distillers grains (wet or modified) were relatively inexpensive as a percentage of grain price (70 to 90% on a dry-to-dry basis), and corn residue (baled stalks) were relatively inexpensive ($50 to $70/ton). As a result, research focused on how to use more residue and distillers grains and less corn grain. Two research areas were evaluated: alkaline treatment of corn stalks and increasing use of corn silage as methods to decrease corn usage. The questions were if you decrease corn inclusion, will performance be maintained or will feed conversion get worse. Even with some depression (increase) in F:G, will cost of gain be more competitive.