Campus Units

Economics

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

10-2009

Journal or Book Title

Economic Development and Cultural Change

Volume

58

Issue

1

First Page or Article ID Number

25

Last Page

52

DOI

10.1086/605209

Abstract

As early as 1962, international agencies such as the United Nations and the World Bank were advising that the decentralization of public service delivery could serve as a development strategy. The strategy has become even more prominent over the past 15 years, particularly in education.1 Decentralization efforts in developed countries include various programs in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Spain, the United Kingdom, and in at least 44 states in the United States. Among the developing countries, Burkina Faso, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, El Salvador, Honduras, India, and Nicaragua have introduced new programs aimed at devolving power to the local schools. Even the autocratic government in Pakistan initiated an effort to devolve responsibility for school management to local authorities, removing a functioning democracy as a necessary precondition for school decentralization.

Comments

This is an article from Economic Development and Cultural Change 58 (2009): 25, doi: 10.1086/605209. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

The University of Chicago

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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