Campus Units

Economics

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Submitted Manuscript

Publication Date

2001

Journal or Book Title

The Journal of Human Resources

Volume

36

Issue

2

First Page or Article ID Number

304

Last Page

326

DOI

10.2307/3069661

Abstract

Variation in school attributes, proximity, and fees across neighborhoods is used to identify factors that affect whether poor households send their children to government school, private school, or no school. Analysis shows that even the poorest households use private schools extensively, and that utilization increases with income. Lowering private school fees or distance or raising measured quality raises private school enrollments, partly by transfers from government schools and partly from enrollments of children who otherwise would not have gone to school. The strong demand for private schools is consistent with evidence of greater mathematics and language achievement in private schools than in government schools. These results strongly support an increased role for private delivery of schooling services to poor households in developing countries.

Comments

This is a manuscript of an article from The Journal of Human Resources 36 (2001): 304, doi: 10.2307/3069661. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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