Campus Units

Economics

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

3-2006

Journal or Book Title

Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences

Volume

63

Issue

3

First Page or Article ID Number

699

Last Page

710

DOI

10.1139/f05-247

Abstract

The failures of traditional target-species management have led many to propose an ecosystem approach to fisheries to promote sustainability. The ecosystem approach is necessary, especially to account for fishery ecosystem interactions, but by itself is not sufficient to address two important factors contributing to unsustainable fisheries: inappropriate incentives bearing on fishers and the ineffective governance that frequently exists in commercial, developed fisheries managed primarily by total-harvest limits and input controls. We contend that much greater emphasis must be placed on fisher motivation when managing fisheries. Using evidence from more than a dozen natural experiments in commercial fisheries, we argue that incentive-based approaches that better specify community and individual harvest or territorial rights and price ecosystem services and that are coupled with public research, monitoring, and effective oversight promote sustainable fisheries.

Comments

This article is from Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, 2006, 63(3): 699-710, doi:10.1139/f05-247.

Rights

Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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