Title

Education

Campus Units

Economics

Document Type

Book Chapter

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2013

Journal or Book Title

Global Problems, Smart Solutions

Editors

Bjørn Lomborg

Publisher

Cambridge University Press

Place of Publication

New York

First Page or Article ID Number

273

Last Page

304

Abstract

The World Bank's first effort to spur educational investments in children was in Tunisia in 1962. At that time, 41 percent of the world's children aged 6-11 were not in school. 1 In SSA, only 25 percent of primary-aged children were in school, while enrollment rates in the Arab States (39 percent) and South Asia (44 percent) were only modestly better. Their parents were not in a position to produce the education in the home - only one-third of the adult population in low-income countries were literate and the average adult education level was 1.6 years. Even in middle-income countries, about 20 percent of the primary-aged children were not in school, and one-third of their parents were illiterate with an average education level of 2.8 years. Given the overwhelming evidence that literacy and schooling can improve health and economic outcomes, the World Bank's focus was on expanding the supply of available schools and qualified teachers.

Comments

This chapter is from Global Problems, Smart Solutions (2013): 273. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

Copenhagen Consensus Center

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf