Campus Units

Economics

Document Type

Book Chapter

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

1996

Journal or Book Title

The Economics of Agriculture: Papers in Honor of D. Gale Johnson

Volume

2

Editors

John M. Antle and Daniel A. Sumner

Publisher

The University of Chicago Press

Place of Publication

Chicago

First Page or Article ID Number

55

Last Page

79

Abstract

Labor, or the time of the human agent, is one of the most important inputs in production. Labor services in agriculture are provided: by farm operators/ managers who perform very important allocative, production/marketing decision making and supervisory functions (Schultz 1972; Huf&nan 1985; Huffman 199lb) and frequently engage directly in production; by members of the operator's family or relatives who largely work without direct compensation; and by hired workers. The incomes of farm families and of hired farm workers are determined not only by the amount of labor that they sell but also by the amount of other resources to which they hold income rights. Historically, issues have been raised not only about trends in the functional distribution of income in the United States but also about how well labor and capital markets are functioning to keep returns comparable across sectors and regions.

Comments

This chapter is from The Economics of Agriculture: Papers in Honor of D. Gale Johnson 2 (1996): 55. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

The University of Chicago

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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