Campus Units

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2006

Journal or Book Title

Evolutionary Ecology Research

Volume

8

First Page

23

Last Page

35

Abstract

Question: Does habitat heterogeneity promote trophic polymorphism in a terrestrial salamander?

Hypothesis: Eastern red-backed salamanders (Plethodon cinereus) in upland and lowland habitats differ morphologically because their prey’s size differs between those habitats.

Field site: Five mature hardwood forests in central New York and northern Pennsylvania, USA, with known differences in diet between upland and lowland habitats.

Methods: We collected animals and examined their stomach contents and their cranial morphology, the latter with digital stereomicroscope images and morphometric methods.

Results: We found morphological differences between upland and lowland salamanders, although there was a considerable phenotypic range for both habitats. Lowland salamanders generally had relatively shorter heads and a lower jaw/head ratio, and upland salamanders generally had the converse. Within and among habitats, cranial morphology was associated with diet, where salamanders with lowland-like morphology consumed more large prey and fewer small prey, and salamanders with upland-like morphology consumed the converse.

Conclusions: The observed trophic polymorphism and association with food use within populations suggests that this variation may accentuate variation at larger scales, and may play an important role in diversification within the genus.

Comments

This article is from Evolutionary Ecology Research 8 (2006): 23. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

The Authors

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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