Document Type

Article

Publication Date

3-2013

Journal or Book Title

Journal of Asia-Pacific Entomology

Volume

16

Issue

1

First Page

87

Last Page

97

DOI

10.1016/j.aspen.2012.11.004

Abstract

Population genetics strategies offer an alternative and powerful approach for obtaining information about long-distance movement, and have been widely used for examining patterns and magnitude of insect dispersal over geographic and temporal scales. Such strategies are based on the principle that genetic divergence between local populations reflects the interplay between genetic drift and gene flow, and thus can function as an indicator of dispersal capacity. Relatively new approaches for inferring population history are widely applicable for documenting introduction routes of invasive or quarantine species. These approaches are based on genetic variability calculated from changes in gene frequency of subpopulations, measured using molecular genetic markers. Inferences from population genetics can supplement and corroborate conventional observational approaches for characterizing insect dispersal and have provided important clues to many questions raised in the field of behavior and ecology of insects. Here, we summarize our work on the boll weevil as a case study to illustrate the kinds of information on dispersal capacity and dispersal patterns that can be obtained from population genetics techniques that would be difficult or impossible to acquire in other ways. Then we provide examples of how the molecular markers and population genetics tools have been applied to answer immediate questions of relevance to eradication program managers. Though the latter are idiosyncratic to this particular pest, they demonstrate the kinds and range of problems that can be addressed in other systems through application of population genetics strategies.

Comments

This article is from Journal of Asia-Pacific Entomology 16 (2013): 87, doi:10.1016/j.aspen.2012.11.004.

Rights

Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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