Document Type

Book Chapter

Publication Date

2001

Journal or Book Title

Genetically Modified Organisms in Agriculture : Economics and Politics

Volume

28

First Page

283

Last Page

289

Abstract

The ability to transform crop plants to express the insecticidal toxins from B. thuringiensis is likely to have profound effects on the future of pest management. The benefits of the technology in terms of yield protection and reduced environmental disruption relative to synthetic insecticides must be balanced in terms of the uncertainty associated with risk to nontarget organisms, such as the monarch butterfly. The issue has drawn attention to an important aspect of genetic engineering. More attention needs to be directed at clarifying risk assessment and communicating that information, particularly to non-scientific audiences. The consortium of researchers, industry, and environmental advocacy groups that has been assembled to address concerns related to the monarch butterfly and Bt corn represents an unparalleled level of cooperation and is indicative of the product stewardship that is essential for the full benefits of the technology to be realized. One of the goals of the consortium is to develop high quality research data so that decision making is based on sound science.

Comments

This chapter is from Genetically Modified Organisms in Agriculture : Economics and Politics 28 (2001): pp. 283-289. Posted with permission.

Rights

Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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