Campus Units

Entomology

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

1999

Journal or Book Title

Journal of Economic Entomology

Volume

92

Issue

1

First Page

56

Last Page

67

DOI

10.1093/jee/92.1.56

Abstract

Sixteen natural monoterpenoids and 6 synthetic derivatives were selected for study of larvicidal activity and growth inhibitory effect against the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner). For this study, 2 different dietary exposure bioassays were used: compounds applied on the diet surface (on-diet), and compounds incorporated into the diet (in-diet). Most of the monoterpenoid compounds showed some degree of larvicidal activity in both bioassay procedures after a 6-d exposure period. Among the monoterpenoids, pulegone was the most active. Larvicidal toxicities were significantly enhanced for the structurally modified compounds; monoterpenoid derivatives MTEE-25 (2-fluoroethyl thymyl ether) and MTEE-P (propargyl citronellate) were most toxic to borer larvae. When reared on diet containing the monoterpenoids or their derivatives, changes in developmental parameters and pupal weights of the European corn borer also were noted when they were fed several of the compounds. Some larvae reared on treated diet with higher concentrations of the test compounds died before pupating. In general, growth and development of the European corn borer were affected by monoterpenoid compounds, and some compounds such as l-menthol, pulegone, MTEE-25, and MTEE-P acted as insect growth inhibitors.

Comments

This article is from Journal of Economic Entomology 92 (1999): 56, doi:10.1093/jee/92.1.56. Posted with permission.

Rights

This article is the copyright property of the Entomological Society of America and may not be used for any commercial or other private purpose without specific permission of the Entomological Society of America.

Copyright Owner

Entomological Society of America

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Included in

Entomology Commons

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