Campus Units

Entomology, Microbiology

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2000

Journal or Book Title

Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part B: Pesticides, Food Contaminants, and Agricultural Wastes

Volume

35

Issue

4

First Page

417

Last Page

438

DOI

10.1080/03601230009373280

Abstract

This study was conducted to determine the effects of pesticide mixtures on degradation patterns of parent compounds as well as effects on soil microbial respiration. Bioavailability of residues to sensitive plant species was also determined. Soil for this study was obtained from a pesticide‐contaminated area within an agrochemical dealer site. Degradation patterns were not affected by the presence or absence of other herbicides in this study. Atrazine concentrations were significantly lower at 21 through 160 days aging time compared to day 0 concentrations. Metolachlor and pendimethalin concentrations were not significantly different over time and remained high throughout the study. Microbial respiration was suppressed in treated soils from day 21 to day 160. Soybean and canola were the most successful plant species in the germination and survival tests. Generally, with increased aging of pesticides in soil, germination time decreased. Survival time of plants increased over time for some treatments indicating possible decreased bioavailability of pesticide residues. In some cases, survival time decreased at the longer 160‐day aging period, possibly indicating a change in bioavailability, perhaps as the result of formation of more bioavailable and phytotoxic metabolites. No interactive effects were noted for mixtures of pesticides compared to individually applied pesticides in terms of degradation of the parent compound or on seed germination, plant survival, or microbial respiration.

Comments

This article is from Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part B: Pesticides, Food Contaminants, and Agricultural Wastes 35 (2000): 417, doi:10.1080/03601230009373280.

Rights

Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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