Campus Units

Entomology

Document Type

Book Chapter

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2003

Journal or Book Title

Environmental Fate and Effects of Pesticides

Volume

853

Issue

9

First Page

157

Last Page

166

DOI

10.1021/bk-2003-0853.ch009

Abstract

The ability of native prairie grasses, big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii Vitman), Yellow indiangrass (Sorghastrum nutans L.), and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), to degrade atrazine and metolachlor was evaluated in two soils denoted as Alpha and Bravo soils. Vegetation significantly decreased the amount of remaining atrazine in Alpha soil when the concentration of atrazine before vegetation was 93 μg g-1, but had no effect on the degradation of atrazine when it was 4.9 μg g-1. The significant effect of the plants on atrazine degradation in Alpha soil occurred at 57 days after the transplanting of vegetation, but not at 28 days after the transplanting of vegetation. The grasses did not enhance the degradation of atrazine in Bravo soil due to the population of atrazine-degrading microorganisms in that soil. The native prairie grasses had a significant positive effect on the enhanced degradation of metolachlor in both soils, and the significant effect was observed at 28 and 57 days after the transplanting of vegetation in Alpha and Bravo soil, respectively. NH4NO3 had no effect on the degradation of atrazine and metolachlor in either soil. Our results indicate that it is feasible to use the native prairie grasses to help remediate the soils contaminated with high concentrations of atrazine and metolachlor, especially in the absence of the indigenous atrazine or metolachlor degraders.

Comments

Reprinted (adapted) with permission from Environmental Fate and Effects of Pesticides, 853(9); 157-166. Doi: 10.1021/bk-2003-0853.ch009. 2003 American Chemical Society.

Copyright Owner

American Chemical Society

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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