Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2012

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Anthropology

First Advisor

Jill D Pruetz

Abstract

Part of the conservation strategy of zoos is participation in ex situ conservation efforts in the form of captive breeding programs. Standardizing methods to describe and quantify behavior of animals housed at different institutions is an essential tool for understanding intra-species behaviors [Carlstead 2000; Carlstead 2002]. The primary objective of this study was to determine if a significant difference exists between the behavior of captive and wild populations of Lemur catta (ring-tailed lemurs) and to explore the implications of the results for captive management and reintroduction programs. Captive lemurs were found to be more inactive than wild lemurs and the type of enclosure (indoor or outdoor) had an impact on their species-typical sunning behavior. Zoos have several options to promote and maintain species-specific behaviors in captive populations.

Copyright Owner

Taylor Shire

Language

en

Date Available

2012-10-31

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

80 pages

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