Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

2013

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Computer Science

First Advisor

David Fernández-Baca

Abstract

This dissertation addresses some of the algorithmic and combinatorial problems at the interface between biology and computation.

In particular, it focuses on problems in both computational phylogenetics, an area of study in which computation is used to better understand evolutionary relationships, and algorithmic self-assembly, an area of study in which biological processes are used to perform computation.

The first set of results investigate inferring phylogenetic trees from multi-state character data. We give a novel characterization of when a set of three-state characters has a perfect phylogeny and make progress on a long-standing conjecture regarding the compatibility of multi-state characters.

The next set of results investigate inferring phylogenetic supertrees from collections of smaller input trees when the input trees do not fully agree on the relative positions of the taxa. Two approaches to dealing with such conflicting input trees are considered. The first is to contract a set of edges in the input trees so that the resulting trees have an agreement supertree. The second is to remove a set of taxa from the input trees so that the resulting trees have an agreement supertree. We give fixed-parameter tractable algorithms for both approaches.

We then turn to the algorithmic self-assembly of fractal structures from DNA tiles and investigate approximating the Sierpinski triangle and the Sierpinski carpet with strict self-assembly. We prove tight bounds on approximating the Sierpinski triangle and exhibit a class of fractals that are generalizations of the Sierpinski carpet that can approximately self-assemble.

We conclude by discussing some ideas for further research.

Copyright Owner

Brad Shutters

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

153 pages

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