Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2015

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Political Science

First Advisor

David Andersen

Abstract

Citizen competence--though not always referred to in those exact words--is a common and important topic in political science. This thesis proposes a definition of citizen competence that is heavily, though not entirely, contingent on a person's effort in gathering political information. Using data from the 2012 ANES pre-election survey, an empirical analysis is also conducted. Forty hypotheses are tested using one-way ANOVAs to look at the correlation between citizen competence and citizen satisfaction with common normative ideals held regarding American democracy. Results indicate that there is strong support for the theory that citizen competence is correlated with citizen satisfaction of two normative ideals: 1) Government pays attention to what the people think and 2) the views of the people affect what the government does.

Copyright Owner

Brett M. Daley

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

95 pages

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