Campus Units

Food Science and Human Nutrition, Agronomy

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

9-2001

Journal or Book Title

Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society

Volume

78

Issue

9

First Page

937

Last Page

940

DOI

10.1007/s11746-001-0367-z

Abstract

Off-flavors associated with oxidized oils make it difficult to recruit sensory panelists to evaluate the oils. Using an instrument called the “electronic nose” to monitor the formation of volatile compounds associated with off-flavors could help to interpret oil oxidation studies in part to supplement human sensory panels. No published studies evaluate the correlation of oil oxidation sensory data and “electronic nose” analyses. Therefore, this project was designed to determine the correlation between sensory evaluation and “electronic nose” analyses. Canola, corn, and soybean oils were stored at 60°C in the dark until sufficiently oxidized. On days 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12, oils were evaluated for peroxide value, for volatile compounds by “electronic nose,” and for off-flavor by sensory evaluation. The results suggest that the “electronic nose” is capable of measuring changes in volatile compounds associated with oil oxidation and could be used to supplement data obtained from sensory evaluations.

Comments

This article is from Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society, September 2001, 78(9); 937-940. Doi: 10.1007/s11746-001-0367-z.

Rights

Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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