Document Type

Article

Publication Date

8-2008

Journal or Book Title

Plant Physiology

Volume

147

Issue

4

First Page

1822

Last Page

1829

DOI

10.​1104/​pp.​108.​121269

Abstract

The acs1 knockout mutant that has a disruption in the plastidic acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase (ACS; At5g36880) gene was used to explore the role of this protein and plastidic acetate metabolism in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Disruption of the ACS gene decreased ACS activity by 90% and largely blocked the incorporation of exogenous 14C-acetate and 14C-ethanol into fatty acids. Whereas the disruption had no significant effect on the synthesis of bulk seed triacylglycerols, the acs1 plants were smaller and flowered later. This suggests that the pyruvate dehydrogenase bypass provided by the aerobic fermentation pathway that converts pyruvate to acetate and probably on to fatty acids is important to the plants during normal growth. The role of ACS in destroying fermentative intermediates is supported by the increased sensitivity of the acs1mutant to exogenous acetate, ethanol, and acetaldehyde compared to wild-type plants. Whereas these observations suggest that flux through the aerobic fermentation pathway is important, the reason for this flux is unclear. Interestingly, acetate is able to support high rates of plant growth on medium and this growth is blocked in the acs1 mutant.

Comments

This article is from Plant Physiology 147, no. 4 (August 2008): 1822–1829, doi:10.1104/pp.108.121269.

Copyright Owner

American Society of Plant Biologists

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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