Document Type

Book Review

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

Spring 2008

Journal or Book Title

Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft

Volume

3

Issue

1

First Page

88

Last Page

91

DOI

10.1353/mrw.0.0102

Abstract

Historians of witchcraft and of early America know the long shadow cast by the Salem witch hunt of 1692. They also know what distortions and [End Page 88] misperceptions that shadow can bring. The number of those accused of witchcraft in Salem, and the numbers executed for this crime, surpass the totals for the rest of New England across the entire seventeenth century. The trials were, therefore, an enormous abnormality. Yet precisely because they generated the majority of witchcraft cases in colonial America, and because Salem has attained such cachet in popular culture, the trials continue to attract an enormous amount of scholarly attention. One can count almost (not quite) on one hand the number of books dealing with New England witchcraft that have not focused exclusively on Salem (Godbeer's own earlier The Devil's Dominion being among them). So great is the marketing force of the name that even this book about a separate, far more contained, and far more typical witch trial contains "Salem" in its title.

Comments

This is a book review from Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft 3 (2008): 88, doi:10.1353/mrw.0.0102. Posted with permission.

Rights

All rights reserved. Except for brief quotations used for purposes of scholarly citation, none of this work may be reproduced in any form by any means without written permission from the publisher. For information address the University of Pennsylvania Press, 3905 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-4112.

Copyright Owner

University of Pennsylvania Press

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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