Project ID

1991-32

Abstract

Weed control is by far the most pervasive and costly need in agriculture, both in underdevel­ oped as well as in technologically advanced production systems. In 1994, losses due to weeds in U.S. agriculture—including herbi­ cide costs and yield losses—amounted to over $ 15 billion, and about 96% of the more than 21 million acres of row crops grown in Iowa received at least one chemical herbicide appli­ cation. Pesticide use statistics reveal that more herbicides are used than any other class of pesticide. Despite the extensive use of herbi­ cides, certain weed species continue to cause problems in agriculture, and current control strategies for some of these are inadequate. Among these weeds are johnsongrass (Sor­ ghum halapense), the morning glorys (Ipomoea spp.), nutsedges (Cyperus esculentus), shattercane (Sorghum bicolor), and velvetleaf (Abutillon theophrasti).

Principal Investigator(s)

A. H. Epstein

Co-Investigator(s)

Micheal D. K. Owen, L. H. Tiffany

Year of Grant Completion

1995

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