Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Submitted Manuscript

Publication Date

Fall 2012

Journal or Book Title

Teaching Ethics

Volume

13

Issue

1

First Page

105

Last Page

128

DOI

10.5840/tej201213134

Abstract

This study examines relationships between perceived ethical climate types, as determined using Victor and Cullen’s (1988) ethical climate questionnaire, and actual cheating behavior by students completing a take-home exam problem. Data regarding students’ behavior were gathered from sixty-four students in two sections of an accounting course at a well-known university. Our major finding is that students who perceive the classroom as a benevolent climate focused on local groups (i.e. team identification is preeminent) engage in more cheating behavior than do students who perceive a benevolent climate focused on broader organization or societal groups. We conclude by discussing the ethical and pedagogical implications of this association between team-interest climate and higher levels of cheating behavior.

Comments

This is a manuscript of an article from Teaching Ethics 13 (2012): 105, doi: 10.5840/tej201213134. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

Philosophy Documentation Center

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf