Campus Units

Materials Science and Engineering, Chemical and Biological Engineering, Ames Laboratory

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

12-6-2016

Journal or Book Title

Polymers

Volume

8

Issue

12

First Page

422

DOI

10.3390/polym8120422

Abstract

Understanding macrophage responses to biomaterials is crucial to the success of implanted medical devices, tissue engineering scaffolds, and drug delivery vehicles. Cellular responses to materials may depend synergistically on multiple surface chemistries, due to the polyvalent nature of cell–ligand interactions. Previous work in our lab found that different surface functionalities of chemically modified alginate could sway macrophage phenotype toward either the pro-inflammatory or pro-angiogenic phenotype. Using these findings, this research aims to understand the relationship between combined material surface chemistries and macrophage phenotype. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) secretion, nitrite production, and arginase activity were measured and used to determine the ability of the materials to alter macrophage phenotype. Cooperative relationships between pairwise modifications of alginate were determined by calculating synergy values for the aforementioned molecules. Several materials appeared to improve M1 to M2 macrophage reprogramming capabilities, giving valuable insight into the complexity of surface chemistries needed for optimal incorporation and survival of implanted biomaterials.

Comments

This article is published as Bygd, Hannah C., and Kaitlin M. Bratlie. "Investigating the Synergistic Effects of Combined Modified Alginates on Macrophage Phenotype." Polymers 8, no. 12 (2016): 422, doi:10.3390/polym8120422. Posted with permission.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Copyright Owner

The Authors

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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