Campus Units

North Central Regional Plant Introduction Station

Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Conference

Fifth National Symposium: New Crops and New Uses: Strength in Diversity

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2002

Journal or Book Title

Trends in New Crops and New Uses

First Page

506

Last Page

508

Conference Title

Fifth National Symposium: New Crops and New Uses: Strength in Diversity

Conference Date

November 10-13, 2001

City

Atlanta, Georgia

Abstract

During the 1990s, the popularity of the genus Echinacea Moench (Asteraceae) as a dietary supplement in the United States increased markedly, as the general public learned of its possible efficacy in fighting colds and other illnesses (Bauer and Wagner 1991; Li 1998). Plant and medical scientists responded to this phenomenon by increasing their efforts to understand the biology, cultivation, and pharmacology of these plants. Unfortunately, very few well-documented living collections of Echinacea were readily available to support that research. Well-documented germplasm collections could also be used to broaden the genetic base of ornamental Echinacea cultivars, which are widely cultivated as attractive landscape perennials.

Comments

This is a proceeding from Fifth National Symposium: New Crops and New Uses: Strength in Diversity (2002): 506.

Rights

Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Article Location

 
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