Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

7-2003

Journal or Book Title

Journal of Soil and Water Conservation

Volume

58

Issue

4

First Page

198

Last Page

206

Abstract

Riparian buffers and constructed wetlands are best management practices (BMPs) that can improve water quality. However, these practices are not equally effective in all locations. Our objective was to develop maps to help plan the placement of BMPs in a watershed for water quality benefits. Tipton Creek, a 49,000-acre Iowa watershed, provided a case study. Buffer-placement maps, developed from analysis of 30 m (100 ft) elevation data, identified riparian locations with large wetness indices, where buffer vegetation could intercept sheet/rill flows from significant upslope areas. These sites were numerous, typically small (<200 m in length) and well distributed spatially. However results showed 57% of riparian grid cells would receive runoff from less than 0.4 ha (1 ac). Candidate wetland sites were also mapped by applying interpretive and automated techniques to terrain analyses results. A team of conservation professionals evaluated the planning utility of these maps in the field through consensus-seeking discussion. Buffer maps highlighted areas where, team members agreed, perennial vegetation could effectively intercept runoff and/or manage seasonal wetness. The review team also located three feasible wetland sites, which were all identified by an automated technique showing 12 candidate sites. The methods only required public data and should be applicable to other watersheds.

Comments

This article is from Journal of Soil and Water Conservation 58 (2003): 198.

Rights

Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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