Campus Units

Natural Resource Ecology and Management, Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology, Horticulture

Document Type

Book Review

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

10-3-2017

Journal or Book Title

Journal of Mammalogy

Volume

98

Issue

5

First Page

1509

Last Page

1510

DOI

10.1093/jmammal/gyx108

Abstract

A common thought among graduate students is: “how do established scientists get where they are today?” In Serendipity: An Ecologist’s Quest to Understand Nature, James Estes offers a personal reflection on research experiences spanning his 50-year career, beginning as a Ph.D. student in 1970 and concluding with recognition as a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 2014. Estes chronologically outlines the foundational trophic cascade ecology research that he and colleagues conducted in the Aleutian Islands, examining key relationships among kelp forests, sea otters, sea urchins, and killer whales through anecdotal stories of achievement and challenge. Estes’ 3 main goals in writing this book are to: (1) recount what he had learned from 50 years of research; (2) provide a larger story of how predators and prey interact with one another; and (3) explain how science “really happens.”

Comments

This is a review published as Ball, E. E., D. M. Adams, J. N. Dupuie, M. M. Jones, P. G. McGovern, R. M. Ruden, S. R. Schmidt et al. "Serendipity: An Ecologist’s Quest to Understand Nature." Journal of Mammalogy 98, no. 5 (2017): 1509-1510. doi: 10.1093/jmammal/gyx108.

Rights

Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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