Document Type

Book Chapter

Publication Date

9-2008

Journal or Book Title

Vanishing Present: Wisconsin's Changing Lands, Waters, and Wildlife

Volume

Chapter 5

First Page

61

Last Page

73

Abstract

Changes in a landscape usually involve many intertwined factors. These factors include species-specific properties (like the life span of birches), the environment (e.g., drought or soil type), natural disturbances like fire and wind, and human influences like logging. All these factors act at various scales across the landscape and through time. Changes occur over months, years, decades, centuries, and thousands of years. Drought during a summer month, for example, may act as a short-term trigger for changes in the birch forest, whereas soils and slopes generally remain the same for millennia. Environments also vary across space, reflecting local site factors and differences in history. These differences may be sharp and local, as when they reflect different glacial formations or soils, or more gradually distributed through our region, as with differences in climate.

Comments

This chapter is from Vanishing Present: Wisconsin's Changing Lands, Waters, and Wildlife, chapter 5 (2008): 61. Posted with permission

Copyright Owner

University of Chicago Press

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS