Campus Units

Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Agronomy

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

6-2016

Journal or Book Title

Current Protocols in Plant Biology

Volume

1

First Page

263

Last Page

283

DOI

10.1002/cppb.20012

Abstract

Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a powerful and rapid approach for determining the functions of plant genes. The basis of VIGS is that a viral genome is engineered so that it can carry fragments of plant genes, typically in the 200 to 300 base pair size range. The recombinant viruses are used to infect experimental plants, and wherever the virus invades, the target gene or genes will be silenced. VIGS is thus transient, and in the span of a few weeks, it is possible to design VIGS constructs and then generate loss-of-function phenotypes through RNA silencing of the target genes. In soybean (Glycine max), the Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) has been engineered to be valuable tool for silencing genes with diverse functions and also for over-expression of foreign genes. This protocol describes a method for designing BPMV constructs and using them to silence or transiently express genes in soybean.

Comments

This article is published as Whitham, Steven A., Lori M. Lincoln, R. V. Chowda‐Reddy, Jaime D. Dittman, Jamie A. O'Rourke, and Michelle A. Graham. "Virus‐Induced Gene Silencing and Transient Gene Expression in Soybean (Glycine max) Using Bean Pod Mottle Virus Infectious Clones." Current Protocols in Plant Biology 1 (2016): 263-283. doi: 10.1002/cppb.20012.

Rights

Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf