Document Type

Article

Publication Date

12-2012

Journal or Book Title

Law and Human Behavior

Volume

36

Issue

6

First Page

478

Last Page

487

DOI

10.1037/h0093931

Abstract

Verbally recalling the appearance of a perpetrator and the details of an event can sometimes hinder later eyewitness memory performance. In two experiments, we investigated the effects of verbally recalling a face on people's ability to resist subsequent misinformation about that face. Participants watched a video of a theft and then completed either a recall test or a distractor activity. After a delay, some participants heard a piece of misinformation. Memory was assessed with a recall test in Experiment 1 and with a target-present lineup in Experiment 2. In both experiments, initial testing reduced eyewitness suggestibility for the face. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)

Comments

This is a manuscript of an article from Law and Human Behavior 36 (2012): 478, doi:10.1037/h0093931. Posted with permission. This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.

Copyright Owner

Chan, et al.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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