Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Accepted Manuscript

Publication Date

11-2014

Journal or Book Title

Development and Psychopathology

Volume

26

Issue

4pt1

First Page

1113

Last Page

1128

DOI

10.1017/S0954579414000200

Abstract

Social disorganization theory posits that individuals who live in disadvantaged neighborhoods are more likely to engage in antisocial behavior than are those who live in advantaged neighborhoods and that neighborhood disadvantage asserts this effect through its disruptive impact on social ties. Past research on this framework has been limited in two respects. First, most studies have concentrated on adolescent males. In contrast, the present study focused on a sample of adult African American females. Second, past research has largely ignored individual-level factors that might explain why people who grow up in disadvantaged neighborhoods often do not engage in antisocial behavior. We investigated the extent to which genetic variation contributes to heterogeneity of response to neighborhood conditions. We found that the impact of neighborhood disadvantage on antisocial behavior was mediated by neighborhood social ties. Further, the analysis indicated that the effects of neighborhood disadvantage and social ties on antisocial behavior were moderated by genetic polymorphisms. Examination of these moderating effects provided support for the differential susceptibility model of Gene × Environment. The effect of Gene × Neighborhood Disadvantage on antisocial behavior was mediated by the effect of Gene × Neighborhood Social Ties, providing support for an expanded view of social disorganization theory.

Comments

This is the accepted manuscript of an article published in Development and Psychopathology 26 (2014): 1113–1128, doi:10.1017/S0954579414000200. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

Cambridge University Press

Language

eb

File Format

application/pdf

Published Version

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