Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Accepted Manuscript

Publication Date

2015

Journal or Book Title

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition

Volume

41

Issue

5

First Page

1298

Last Page

1315

DOI

10.1037/xlm0000101

Abstract

The mechanism responsible for retrieval-induced forgetting has been the subject of rigorous theoretical debate, with some researchers postulating that retrieval-induced forgetting can be explained by interference (J. G .W. Raaijmakers & E. Jakab, 2013) or context reinstatement (T. R. Jonker, P. Seli, & C. M. MacLeod, 2013), whereas others claim that retrieval-induced forgetting is better explained by inhibition (M. C. Anderson, 2003). A fundamental assumption of the inhibition account is that nonpracticed items are suppressed because they compete for retrieval during initial testing. In the current study, we manipulated competition in a novel interpolated testing paradigm by having subjects learn the nonpracticed items either before (high-competition condition) or after (low-competition condition) they practiced retrieval of the target items. We found retrieval-induced forgetting for the nonpracticed competitors only when they were studied before retrieval practice. This result provides support for a critical assumption of the inhibition account.

Comments

This is a manuscript of an article from Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition 41 (2015): 1298, doi:/10.1037/ xlm0000101. This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.

Copyright Owner

American Psychological Association

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Published Version

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