Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Submitted Manuscript

Publication Date

2014

Journal or Book Title

Journal of Career Assessment

Volume

22

Issue

1

First Page

89

Last Page

101

DOI

10.1177/1069072713487975

Abstract

We examined the role of self-reported effort in predicting chemistry and physics achievement after controlling for prior achievement, gender, and mathematics/science self-efficacy and interest. The data were collected from two Asian Indian high school samples. Self-reported effort was hypothesized to be the most salient predictor of achievement, given its important role in the Asian Indian culture. Based on prior findings, it was also hypothesized that gender would moderate the effect of interest on achievement. Both hypotheses were supported. After other key variables were controlled (prior achievement, gender, and mathematics/science self-efficacy and interest), self-reported effort was a significant predictor of both chemistry achievement and physics achievement. Moreover, gender did moderate the relation of interest and achievement. Boys who were more interested in physics and chemistry achieved higher scores, but girls’ level of interest did not correlate with their achievement.

Comments

This is a manuscript of an article from Journal of Career Assessment 22 (2014): 89, doi:10.1177/1069072713487975. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

The Authors

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf