Campus Units

Psychology

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2015

Journal or Book Title

Journal of Career Assessment

First Page

1

Last Page

14

DOI

10.1177/1069072715616124

Abstract

The underrepresentation of women in leadership positions is a nagging problem in American society. Young women’s leadership intentions drive them to assume leadership opportunities despite barriers. The role of one particular personality trait most identified with leadership, namely, social potency, was examined in directly and indirectly predicting leadership intentions. 124 female college students were sampled. As hypothesized, social potency directly predicted leadership self-efficacy, leadership interest, and one of the two indicators of leadership intentions. Moreover, social potency indirectly predicted leadership intentions through leadership self-efficacy. A bootstrap procedure yielded significant indirect effects of social potency on leadership self-efficacy, leadership interest, and leadership intentions.

Comments

This is a manuscript of an article from Journal of Career Assessment (2015): 1, doi: 10.1177/1069072715616124. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

The Authors

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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