Location

Santa Cruz, CA

Start Date

1-1-1984 12:00 AM

Description

It has been shown in other papers in this volume (1,2) that the application of deconvolution, diffraction, and attenuation corrections to received ultrasonic signals is sufficient to extract the absolute value of the flaw scattering amplitude from the signal. This capability provides a new opportunity to obtain additional flaw characterization information from the ultrasonic signal. More specifically, it is postulated upon reasonable grounds that the absolute magnitude of the front surface ultrasonic echo from a flaw can be related to both the flaw dimensions and its acoustic impedance. Assuming that the size can be obtained by other means, the front surface echo can then be utilized to help identify the flaw. The purpose of this paper is thus twofold: 1) to utilize the diffraction and attenuation corrections developed by Thompson and Gray (3) to obtain absolute values of flaw impulse responses, and 2) to investigate the feasibility of using absolute values of front surface echoes to determine a flaw’s identity.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

3A

Chapter

Chapter 2: Ultrasonics

Section

Signal Processing

Pages

385-393

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4684-1194-2_36

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Absolute Magnitude of Front Surface Reflections in Ultrasonic Measurements

Santa Cruz, CA

It has been shown in other papers in this volume (1,2) that the application of deconvolution, diffraction, and attenuation corrections to received ultrasonic signals is sufficient to extract the absolute value of the flaw scattering amplitude from the signal. This capability provides a new opportunity to obtain additional flaw characterization information from the ultrasonic signal. More specifically, it is postulated upon reasonable grounds that the absolute magnitude of the front surface ultrasonic echo from a flaw can be related to both the flaw dimensions and its acoustic impedance. Assuming that the size can be obtained by other means, the front surface echo can then be utilized to help identify the flaw. The purpose of this paper is thus twofold: 1) to utilize the diffraction and attenuation corrections developed by Thompson and Gray (3) to obtain absolute values of flaw impulse responses, and 2) to investigate the feasibility of using absolute values of front surface echoes to determine a flaw’s identity.