Location

San Diego, CA

Start Date

1-1-1985 12:00 AM

Description

In an effort to apply many NDE techniques to real inspections as in an automated inspection system, one often encounters situations less than ideal. These nonideal conditions frequently cause modification of existing techniques, and in some cases may even force the development of new methods. One factor which commonly causes reconsideration of NDE techniques is the geometry of the area to be inspected, since this will vary from application to application in an unpredictable way. This is true in eddy current inspection methods, which are sensitive to surface and conductivity discontinuities and liftoff variations, [1], and therefore are highly geometry dependent. One example, which is the focus of this paper, is the eddy current inspection of a rectangular opening in a surface, such as an antirotation window in aircraft engine airseals. In this situation, an eddy current inspection technique was sought which would allow detection of surface flaws connected to the window. This paper discusses three conventional methods and one novel method of extracting flaw information from the inspection signal. Experimental data are also presented.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

4A

Chapter

Chapter 2: Eddy Currents

Section

Probes and Instruments

Pages

463-474

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-9421-5_52

Language

en

File Format

Application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Automatic Eddy Current Inspection of Antirotation Windows in F100 Engine Compressor Air Seals

San Diego, CA

In an effort to apply many NDE techniques to real inspections as in an automated inspection system, one often encounters situations less than ideal. These nonideal conditions frequently cause modification of existing techniques, and in some cases may even force the development of new methods. One factor which commonly causes reconsideration of NDE techniques is the geometry of the area to be inspected, since this will vary from application to application in an unpredictable way. This is true in eddy current inspection methods, which are sensitive to surface and conductivity discontinuities and liftoff variations, [1], and therefore are highly geometry dependent. One example, which is the focus of this paper, is the eddy current inspection of a rectangular opening in a surface, such as an antirotation window in aircraft engine airseals. In this situation, an eddy current inspection technique was sought which would allow detection of surface flaws connected to the window. This paper discusses three conventional methods and one novel method of extracting flaw information from the inspection signal. Experimental data are also presented.