Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1990 12:00 AM

Description

Differences between conventional single frequency eddy current (EC) nondestructive testing (NDT) and remote field eddy current (RFEC) NDT are summarized schematically in Fig. 1. In the testing of steam generator tubing, a differential probe (Fig. la) is used to produce impedance plane trajectories (Fig. lc) which are indicative of the tubes condition. From a numerical simulation or modeling point of view, the finite element (FE) prediction of such impedance plane trajectories [1-3] requires a geometry of the dimensions shown in Fig. le. The relatively small mesh sizes associated with the FE simulation of EC probe behavior are a distinct advantage in that only modest computer resources are required. Indeed, for axisymmetric geometries, such code can run on a personal computer.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

9A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Fundamentals of Classical Techniques

Section

C: Eddy Currents

Pages

319-326

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4684-5772-8_39

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

3-D Finite Element Modeling of the Remote Field Eddy Current Effect

Brunswick, ME

Differences between conventional single frequency eddy current (EC) nondestructive testing (NDT) and remote field eddy current (RFEC) NDT are summarized schematically in Fig. 1. In the testing of steam generator tubing, a differential probe (Fig. la) is used to produce impedance plane trajectories (Fig. lc) which are indicative of the tubes condition. From a numerical simulation or modeling point of view, the finite element (FE) prediction of such impedance plane trajectories [1-3] requires a geometry of the dimensions shown in Fig. le. The relatively small mesh sizes associated with the FE simulation of EC probe behavior are a distinct advantage in that only modest computer resources are required. Indeed, for axisymmetric geometries, such code can run on a personal computer.