Publication Date

January 2003

Abstract

Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of Escherichia coli (EC) are often used to monitor the effect of antimicrobial use regimens on the antimicrobial resistance (AR) reservoir in animal species. Epidemiological studies of AR may involve the identification of thousands of bacterial isolates, so complete biochemical identification of EC can be prohibitively expensive and time consuming. In this study an abbreviated biochemical scheme using colony phenotype and the indole test results in a sensitivity and specificity of 91.7% and 100% respectively for identification of EC as compared to a commercial biochemical identification kit. This abbreviated scheme results in over US$500 savings per 100 candidate EC isolates identified. These savings have significant benefits to the economics of conducting epidemiologic investigations of AR.

Book Title

Safe Pork: 5th International Symposium on the Epidemiology and Control of Foodborn Pathogens in Pork

Pages

107-109

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

 
Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Abbreviated identification scheme for Eschericia coli in swine feces

Herkalion, Greece

Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of Escherichia coli (EC) are often used to monitor the effect of antimicrobial use regimens on the antimicrobial resistance (AR) reservoir in animal species. Epidemiological studies of AR may involve the identification of thousands of bacterial isolates, so complete biochemical identification of EC can be prohibitively expensive and time consuming. In this study an abbreviated biochemical scheme using colony phenotype and the indole test results in a sensitivity and specificity of 91.7% and 100% respectively for identification of EC as compared to a commercial biochemical identification kit. This abbreviated scheme results in over US$500 savings per 100 candidate EC isolates identified. These savings have significant benefits to the economics of conducting epidemiologic investigations of AR.