Publication Date

2015

Abstract

We compared the results from meat inspection of organic/free-range finishing pigs versus conventionallyraised pigs. Data covered a period of 1 year and were collected from one abattoir in Denmark. In total, there were 201,160 organic/free-range pigs and 1,173,213 conventionally raised pigs. Over-all speaking, there was an equal number of lesions recorded in the two kinds of production systems. The majority of the lesion types were recorded infrequently (<4%). Only chronic pleuritis was a common finding in both types of production systems. A total of 13 lesion types were more frequent among organic/free-range pigs than among conventional pigs - among others old fractures, tail lesions and osteomyelitis. Four lesion types were equally frequent in the two groups: chronic pneumonia, chronic pleuritis, fresh fracture, and abscess in head/ear. Four lesion types were recorded less frequently among organic/free-range pigs compared with conventionally raised pigs. These included abscess in leg/toe, hernia and scar/hock lesion. Possible associations between the individual lesion types and the production systems - including the requirements for each system - are discussed. The results emphasize the importance of using direct animal based parameters when evaluating animal welfare in different types of production systems. Moreover, individual solutions to the health problems observed in a herd should be found, e.g. in collaboration with the veterinary practitioner and other advisors.

Book Title

Safepork 2015 Proceedings Book: Epidemiology and control of hazards in pork production chain – SAFEPORK, One health approach under a concept of farm to fork

Pages

85-88

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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A comparison of lesions found during meat inspection of finishing pigs raised under organic/free-range conditions and conventional indoor conditions

Porto, Portugal

We compared the results from meat inspection of organic/free-range finishing pigs versus conventionallyraised pigs. Data covered a period of 1 year and were collected from one abattoir in Denmark. In total, there were 201,160 organic/free-range pigs and 1,173,213 conventionally raised pigs. Over-all speaking, there was an equal number of lesions recorded in the two kinds of production systems. The majority of the lesion types were recorded infrequently (<4%). Only chronic pleuritis was a common finding in both types of production systems. A total of 13 lesion types were more frequent among organic/free-range pigs than among conventional pigs - among others old fractures, tail lesions and osteomyelitis. Four lesion types were equally frequent in the two groups: chronic pneumonia, chronic pleuritis, fresh fracture, and abscess in head/ear. Four lesion types were recorded less frequently among organic/free-range pigs compared with conventionally raised pigs. These included abscess in leg/toe, hernia and scar/hock lesion. Possible associations between the individual lesion types and the production systems - including the requirements for each system - are discussed. The results emphasize the importance of using direct animal based parameters when evaluating animal welfare in different types of production systems. Moreover, individual solutions to the health problems observed in a herd should be found, e.g. in collaboration with the veterinary practitioner and other advisors.