Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2010

Journal or Book Title

Foodborne Pathogens and Disease

Volume

7

Issue

7

First Page

795

Last Page

800

DOI

10.1089=fpd.2009.0459

Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the value of deep systemic sub-iliac lymph nodes collected at slaughter as predictors of Salmonella prevalence in live hogs.An observational study was conducted on 24 farms fromSeptember 2006 to February 2009. At least one cohort of market-weight pigs was visited for each farm. Within each cohort, 30 farm fecal samples on farm and 30 sub-iliac lymph nodes from matched pigs at slaughter were collected. Samples were cultured for Salmonella enterica and serotyped by conventionalmethods. Overall, 3.4%(51 of 1490) of farmfeces and 0.06% (1 of 1739) of sub-iliac lymph nodes were Salmonella positive; 71.4% (15 of 21) of farms had at least one positive fecal sample, and 4.2% (1 of 24) had at least one positive sub-iliac lymph node. The median within-farm prevalence of Salmonella in farm fecal samples was 1.7%, ranging from 0% to 38.3%; for sub-iliac lymph nodes the median was 0%, ranging from 0% to 1.1%. The median within-cohort prevalence in farm fecal samples was 0%, ranging from0%to 43.3%; for sub-iliac lymph nodes the median was 0%, ranging from0%to 4%. The predominant serotype detected was Derby, followed by Anatum and Typhimurium (Copenhagen). Salmonella Braenderup was recovered from the sub-iliac lymph node. The low detection rate of Salmonella in sub-iliac lymph nodes (0.06%) limits its usefulness as a dependable predictor of Salmonella contamination originating on farm (3.4%).

Comments

This article is from Foodborne Pathogens and Disease 7 (2010): 795, doi:10.1089=fpd.2009.0459.

Rights

Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf