Campus Units

Agronomy

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Accepted Manuscript

Publication Date

2014

Journal or Book Title

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Volume

111

Issue

8

DOI

10.1073/pnas.1321350111

Abstract

Accounting for the fate of inorganic N fertilizer in agricultural systems is critical to sustainable production. Sebilo et al. (1) provide a unique long-term record of 15NO3 fertilizer fate that demonstrates N molecules from a discrete fertilizer application are transferred to soil organic matter (SOM) and subsequently mineralized over the course of ca.100 years during which they contribute to NO3 leaching. The authors conclude “attempts to reduce agricultural nitrate contamination of aquatic systems must consider the long-term legacy of past applications of synthetic fertilizers”. Further, they suggest a recent decrease in anthropogenic N inputs to the Mississippi River Basin, without a concomitant decrease in riverine NO3 loads, is consistent with their conclusion

Comments

This is an article from Castellano, Michael J., and Mark B. David. "Long-term fate of nitrate fertilizer in agricultural soils is not necessarily related to nitrate leaching from agricultural soils." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 111, no. 8 (2014): E766-E766. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1321350111. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Published Version

Included in

Agriculture Commons

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